Empty

Total: $0.00

WW2 German Nazi Eastern Medal Ostmedaille award

WW2 German Nazi Eastern Medal Ostmedaille award a vendre original vendeur militaire

WW2 German Nazi Eastern Medal Ostmedaille award

$89.00

Product

WW2 German Nazi Eastern Medal Ostmedaille award

The Eastern Medal (German: Ostmedaille), officially the Winter Battle in the East 1941–42 Medal (German: Medaille Winterschlacht im Osten 1941/42), was a military award of the Wehrmacht which was created by ordinance of Adolf Hitler on 26 May 1942.

The Eastern Medal was awarded to any member of the Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS "in recognition of experience in the struggle against the Bolshevik enemy and the Russian winter within the period from 15 November 1941 to 15 April 1942." It was also awarded posthumously to any service member who died in the line of duty within the Soviet Union. It was wryly called the Frozen Meat Medal or the "Order of the Frozen Flesh" (German: Gefrierfleischorden).

Criteria
Wehrmacht personnel qualified for the Eastern Medal after a minimum of 14 days in active combat; 30 air combat sorties; 60 days continuous of service in a combat zone; being wounded or suffering a "frozen limb", severe enough to warrant the issue of a Wound Badge, and it could be awarded posthumously.

On 20 January 1943, official qualification for the Eastern Medal was extended to include both male and female combatant and non-combatant personnel in the Wehrmacht. Also, foreign members of Wehrmacht units; personnel killed or missing in action and civilians working under Wehrmacht control, including those involved in construction and road building. Geographic limits were placed on the award of east of Ukraine and Ostland or in the Finland area, east of the original 1940 Russo/Finnish border. The Eastern Medal was officially decommissioned by the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (German: High Command of the Armed Forces) (OKW) on 4 September 1944.

Appearance

Issue packet
The Eastern Medal was designed by SS-Unterscharführer Ernst Krauit.Measuring 3.6 cm (1.4 in) in diameter, of (generally) zinc construction, the medal was given a gun-metal coloured coating. The concave obverse side features a national socialist eagle grasping a swastika with laurel behind. The reverse features the text in capital letters: "WINTERSCHLACHT IM OSTEN 1941/42" ("Winter Battle in the East 1941-42") featuring a crossed sword and branch below the text. A helmet and stick grenade below the medal loop as well as outer ring were finished in a polished silver effect. The medal measures approximately 44mm by 36mm.

25 years of faithful services in the heer - wehrmacht medal award

25 years of faithful services in the heer - wehrmacht medal award

25 years of faithful services in the heer - wehrmacht medal award

$75.00

Product

25 years of faithful services in the heer - wehrmacht medal award

On 16 March, 1936, Adolf Hitler ordered the institution of a service award in four classes, each class reflecting the completion of a select number of years of military service.

The award was bestowed by each branch of the Wehrmacht (army, navy, and air force) and was issued for four years service (fourth class – silver medal), 12 years (third class – gold medal), 18 years (second class – silver cross), 25 years (first class – gold cross), and 40 years (special class). The 40 year special class was introduced on 10 March 1939.

Recipients of the higher level awards wore the decoration simultaneously with one lower year award. The manner they were worn was:

3rd Class with 4th Class (gold medal with silver medal)
2nd Class with 4th Class (silver cross with silver medal)
1st Class with 3rd Class (gold cross with gold medal).[3]
The Long Service Award was retroactive throughout a service member's career, encompassing Reichswehr service as well as service dating during and before World War I. As such, there were a handful of 40 year awards presented, even though the Nazi era only lasted 12 years (1933-1945).

The awards were worn on the left chest, immediately before the medals commemorating the annexation of Austria, Sudetenland and Memel.

Design
The awards were designed by Professor Dr Richard Klein.

Apart from their finish, (gilt or silver), the third and fourth class medals have a common obverse. Both are 30mm in diameter and bear the German eagle clutching a swastika, surrounded by the words Treue Dienste in der Wehrmacht (Loyal service in the armed forces). The reverse shows the number of years of service, either '4' or '12', surrounded by a wreath.
Likewise, the design of the first and second class crosses are similar. Both bear the German eagle on the obverse center, with the years of service, '18' or '25', on the reverse. The first class is gilt and 38mm wide – the second silver and 35mm. The 40 year award is identical to the first class, with the addition of a gilt oakleaf cluster to the ribbon.

Wehrmacht Long Service Awards were among Nazi era awards reauthorised for wear in 1957, re-designed to remove the now banned swastika symbol.

WW2 German Nazi 1 October 1938 Commemorative Medal award

WW2 German Nazi 1 October 1938 Commemorative Medal award

WW2 German Nazi 1 October 1938 Commemorative Medal award

$69.00

Product

WW2 German Nazi 1 October 1938 Commemorative Medal award

Instituted on 18 October 1938, the medal was awarded to participants in the occupations of Sudetenland in October 1938 and Czechoslovakia in March 1939.

The medal was awarded to all German State officials and members of the German Wehrmacht and SS who entered the Sudetenland on 18 October 1938,[1] and to Sudeten Nazis who had worked for union with Germany.[3] Later a special bar for attachment to the ribbon was introduced for participation in the occupation of the remnants of Czechoslovakia on 15 March 1939,[1] and to others who rendered valuable support.[3] Last awarded on 31 December 1940, a total of 1,162,617 medals and 134,563 bars were bestowed.[1]

The wearing of Nazi era awards was banned in 1945. The Sudetenland medal was not among those awards reauthorized for official wear by the Federal Republic of Germany in 1957.

Design
The medal was circular and similar in appearance as the Anschluss Medal, the reverse only differed in the date. It was designed by Professor Richard Klein. On the obverse a man holding the Nazi flag stands on a podium bearing the eagle emblem of the Third Reich. He assists a second man onto the podium, whose right arm bears a broken shackle. This symbolizes the joining of the area to the Reich. On the reverse is the inscription date "1. Oktober 1938" (1 October 1938). The date is surrounded with the words "Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer" (One People, One Nation, One Leader).

The medal was die-struck and high in detail, with a bronze finish. It was suspended from a striped black, red, black ribbon and white outer stripes, the colors of the Sudetenland.

Prague Castle Bar
For those who had participated in both the occupation of the Sudetenland and the annexation of Bohemia and Moravia on 15 March 1939, a bronze Castle Bar (German: Spange Prager Burg), was approved on 1 May 1939. This bar featured the Prague Castle on the obverse with two triangular prongs in the back, which held it on the ribbon of the prior awarded Sudetenland medal. The bar, like the medal, was die-struck and high in detail, with a bronze finish.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - items with Swastika